The House on Punchbowl Hill



















 
 

The New Adventures of Charlie Chan

 
 

 
 

Episode 1: Your Money or Your Wife

Copyright 1957 by Vision Productions, Ltd. 
An Incorporated Television Corporation (ITC) Production
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
Sound facilities: Ryder Sound Services, Inc.
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Filmed in Hollywood" 
First aired: August 9, 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Sidney Marshall
Associate Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow 
Director: Charles F. Haas 
Assistant Director: Ivan Volkman
Teleplay:  Richard Grey
Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Peach, Sr.
Film Coordinator: Alex Horwitz
Film Editor: Monica Collingwood
Sound: Al Overton
Script Supervisor: George Rutter
Art Director: William Ross      
Set Decorator: Herman N. Shoenbrun
Makeup: Lee Greenway      
Wardrobe: Einar Bourman
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
Lowell Gilmore: Kramer
Virginia Gregg: Constance Parsons
Dayton Loomis: Lt. Hess
Liam Sullivan: Andre Patton
Howard Culver: Lab Technician [George]
 

 
 

PROBABLE LOCATION:

Malibu, California

POSSIBLE DATE:

Late Fall, 1957 (Contance Parson noted to Mr. Kramer: "The summer season is going to start in a few weeks...")

DURATION:

2 days.

SUMMARY:

Mr. Kramer, a wealthy resident of a beach community, calls on Charlie Chan to learn who is trying to kill him.  Soon, Chan and Kramer discover that Kramer's wife, Marsha, is missing and a ransom note that is left behind.  Constance Parsons, Kramer's personal secretary, is interviewed, expressing her passionate hatred of Marsha.  Andre Patton, an artist who painted a commissioned portrait of Mrs. Kramer tells Chan that Marsha used to be his model and that it was he who had introduced her to Mr. Kramer.

 

Later, Kramer finds a package addressed to him in Marsha's handwriting, containing a tape of her pleading for her husband to pay the $50,000 ransom demanded by her abductors.  Police analysis of the tape proves it was recorded at Mr. Kramer's home on his own machine, indicating an inside job.  Staking out the location of the money drop, Chan and Lt. Hess follow the shadowy figure who takes the money and who turns out to be Andre Patton.  At the artist's studio, Marsha’s lifeless body is discovered with Andre protesting his innocence while admitting to working with her to defraud Mr. Kramer.  Soon, an autopsy report indicates that Marsha had been dead for at least eight hours before her body was found.  Chan reasons that Patton would not have killed her only to leave her body in his studio and not making an escape.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Later, Chan returns to speak with Miss Parsons, telling her of his belief that Andre Patton is innocent and that someone else was responsible for Marsha's demise.  Soon, speaking with Mr. Kramer, Chan details his thoughts on the case, suggesting that Kramer may know the identity of the one who actually killed his wife.  Back at the beach house, Kramer finds Constance cleaning the residence, noting that she is preparing it for the approaching summer season.  Pressed, she admits her guilt, stating that she would do anything for Mr. Kramer, who then pulls a gun to kill her.  Chan rushes in and stops him, and taking Constance to the police.  As they leave, Constance tells Kramer, "I killed her to make you happy."

 

OF NOTE:

Mr. Kramer (to Charlie Chan): "When I saw a news story that you were in town working on some cases, I called you."

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
It is indeed a rare artist who can capture a woman's soul in a painting.
 
Even the frightened fawn is aware of the hunter that seeks its life.
 
I have a profound respect for female intuition.
 
An artist's relationship with a married woman should be confined to paints and canvas.
 
Strange, is it not, how wishes can sometimes turn into reality.
 
There are very few motives for murder; one of the most profound is hate, and the most powerful hate grows out of the loss of a most powerful love.
 
When a heart is full of tears, there is no room for understanding.      

 
 

Episode 2: The Secret of the Sea

Copyright 1957 by Vision Productions, Ltd. 
An Incorporated Television Corporation (ITC) Production
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
Sound facilities: Ryder Sound Services, Inc.
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Filmed in Hollywood" 
First aired: 1957 or 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow 
Producer: Sidney Marshall
Associate Producer: Leon Fromkess
Director: Charles F. Haas 
Assistant Director: Ivan Volkman
Teleplay:  Sidney Marshall and Tony Barrett
Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Peach, Sr.
Film Coordinator: Alex Horwitz
Film Editor: Alfred De Gaetano
Sound: Al Overton
Script Supervisor: George Rutter
Art Director: William Ross
Set Decorator: Herman N. Shoenbrun
Makeup: Lee Greenway      
Wardrobe: Einar Bourman
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
Harry Shannon: Captain Carnovan 
Jean Welles: Doris Carnovan
Lane Bradford: Johnny Flynn
John Beradino: Captain Arturo Ramirez
Stuart Randall: Lt. Kovacs
Philip Ahn: Patriarch [Mr. Kim]
Arthur Space: Ed Barker (not credited)
Victor Sen Yung: Ship's Steward [Son of Mr. Kim] (not credited)
 

 
 

LOCATION:

San Pedro, California, the Harbor of Los Angeles (Title reads: "San Pedro, California - The Harbor of Los Angeles")

POSSIBLE DURATION:

3-4 days.

OF NOTE:

Charlie Chan (to Captain Carnavan): "...as far as I know, I have no further assignment in Honolulu."

SUMMARY:

The ship's steward from the Honolulu Star is gunned down as he is about to reveal information to an insurance company about something that was to occur aboard his ship.  Charlie Chan is called by a well-to-do Chinese merchant, Mr. Kim, to learn who killed the young man who turns out to be Kim's son.  To conduct his investigation, Chan signs aboard the freighter, bound for Honolulu, as the Honolulu Star's only passenger.  At dinner with Captain Carnovan and Mr. Flynn, Chan notes the tension aboard ship as Carnavan scolds the new steward.  Doris Carnavan, thirty years her husband's junior, joins the group, with Flynn quickly leaving claiming he has business to attend to.  Suddenly, the ship's engines come to a stop due to a mysterious malfunction 200 miles off the California coast.  In the engine room, Captain Carnavan and Chan discover that the ship has been sabotaged.  Back on deck, the crew has found Mr. Flynn dead of an apparent accident, though Chan suggests otherwise, noting the death of the ship's steward earlier.  Meanwhile, another ship has responded to a radio call for assistance to tow the stricken Honolulu Star back to San Pedro.  Captain Carnavan mentions that the name of the captain of the rescue ship is Arturo Ramirez. 

 

Back in Los Angeles, Chan visits Mr. Kim who tells the detective that he will make inquiries to see if he has any connections to any of the crew of the Honolulu Star.  Interviewed by the police, Ed Barker, the radio operator of the Honolulu Star, tells how he had radioed a general distress message to all ships in the area while receiving a response from Arturo Ramirez' ship offering assistance to the disabled ship.  To tow the ship to port, Ramirez charged $150,000 fee which the insurance company claims to be exorbitant.

  

Through Mr. Kim, Chan soon finds that Doris Carnavan had past connections with Arturo Ramirez.  Doris announces that her husband has gone to kill Ramirez at the latter’s apartment.  Just in time, Chan reaches the scene to stop Carnavan from carrying out his threat.  Chan explains that Ramirez certainly had a confederate aboard the Honolulu Star to help with the fraud scheme, and that Mrs. Carnavan was innocent of any collusion.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Alone in Ramirez' apartment, Chan notes to Ramirez that there was probably no actual distress signal sent out from the Honolulu Star.  He also notes that Ramirez' ship was probably the only one contacted to tow the other ship back to port, thus allowing them to claim the large towing fee in the process.  Pulling a gun on Chan, Ramirez admits that Ed Barker, the radio operator of the Honolulu Star killed both the ship's steward and Mr. Flynn.  Fast work by Chan to disarm Ramirez and the timely arrival of Lt. Kovacs results in the arrest of Ramirez.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
When a man reaches the age of serenity, comfort comes from within.
 
A beautiful woman is like a delicate flower that adds color to the most drab occasion.
 
Detection, and the making of good coffee, sometime require the same ingredient: the proper amount of heat to bring about the desired result.
 
Love is like a blacksmith's hammer - it can shape the white-hot steel of emotion for both good and evil.      

 
 

Episode 3: The Lost Face

Copyright 1957 by Vision Productions, Ltd. 
An Incorporated Television Corporation (ITC) Production
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
Sound facilities: Ryder Sound Services, Inc.
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Filmed in Hollywood" 
First aired: 1957 or 1958 (UK) 
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Sidney Marshall
Associate Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow 
Director: Charles F. Haas 
Assistant Director: Ivan Volkman
Teleplay:  Sidney Marshall and Richard Grey
Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Peach, Sr.
Film Coordinator: Alex Horwitz
Film Editor: Edward De Gaetano
Sound: Al Overton
Script Supervisor: George Rutter
Art Director: William Ross   
Set Decorator: Herman N. Shoenbrun
Makeup: Lee Greenway      
Wardrobe: Einar Bourman
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
Frank Gerstif: Lt. Stutz 
Rodney Bell: Jack Hart 
Dabbs Greer: Zac West
 
Willis Bouchey: Dan Randolph
Austin Green: Willie Browar
 

LOCATION:

San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles, California (Title reads: "The San Fernando Valley - California")

DURATION:

1 day.

OF NOTE:

Lt. Stutz (to Zac West): "Mr. Chan's on a spcial investigation for the Grand Jury."

SUMMARY:

Working as a special investigator for the Grand Jury, Charlie Chan seeks information from Lt. Stutz of the Valley Division of the LAPD on Daniel Randolph, a notorious criminal lawyer who has purported mob connections.  Newspaper reporter Zac West, who is on a crusade of his own against Randolph, is called to Stutz' office to help out.  While there, a telephone call informs Stutz that West's wife has been attacked by an assailant at their home, blinded by acid thrown in her face.  Chan and West go to a nearby cafe run by Willie Brower who, hearing the bad news, tries to comfort Zac.  Soon, Lt. Stutz arrives, informing  Chan and West that the attacker, identified as Jack Hart, has been picked-up.  At police headquarters, attorney Randolph arrives to represent Hart.  Chan notes to Hart that three of Randolph's previous clients, Antonelli, Jarvis, and Bennett, were killed mysteriously soon after having been freed by Randolph.  Later, Chan suggests to Stutz that someone inside the police department may be informing Randolph whenever one of his clients has been arrested.

 

Paying a visit to Randolph’s home, Chan discovers that the lawyer has been shot to death.  Zac West, the prime suspect, is taken into custody by Lt. Stutz at Willie Brower’s cafe.  Following West's arrest, Willie hands Chan an envelope containing a large sum of money to pay Chan to prove West's innocence.  Chan aggress, but states that he will do so only if Willie can accept his findings "even if the guilty one is someone you don’t want found out."  Back at Stutz' office, the Lieutenant admits that he, too, had once tried to kill Randolph who had, he felt, been responsible for his younger brother’s death year earlier.  His attempt had failed due to a defective bullet that had misfired.  At this, Chan notes that Stutz could be under suspicion as much as West, so Stutz has Zac released.

 

CONCLUSION

 

That night, Chan drops into Willie Broward's café for a cup of coffee.  Soon, Jack Hart also arrives for a meeting arranged by Chan.  Chan, suggesting it was Hart who killed Randolph, also notes that there was another "hatchet man" working for Randolph who had been called on to kill Antonelli, Jarvis, and Bennett.  Revealing that it was Willie Jarvis who killed the three men and kept Randolph informed as to which clients had been arrested by the police, Chan moves quickly to disarm Hart and overcome Brower.  As the police take the two men away, Chan tells Willie that the money he had received from him will be used to help attempt restore Mrs. West's vision.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
When a shepherd discovers three of his flock slaughtered, he usually looks for the wolf.
 
Not even the sound of a thousand children's voices can replace the sight of one smudge of dirt on a little rosy cheek.
 
Patience is a man's best friend.
 
Even the strongest tree needs support in a violent storm.
 
A boulder of suspicion cannot stop an avalanche of justice.
 
When a tree is weighted down with the snows of adversity, who is there to say when the limb would break?
 
Ten years to an innocent man is like ten lifetimes.
 
The judge never wields the executioner's ax.

 
 

Episode 4: Blind Man's Bluff

Copyright 1957 by Vision Productions, Ltd. 
An Incorporated Television Corporation (ITC) Production
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
Sound facilities: Ryder Sound Services, Inc.
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Filmed in Hollywood" 
First aired: May 20, 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Director: Les Goodwins 
Teleplay:  Richard Grey
Story: Paul Conlan     
Set Decorator: Herman N. Shoenbrun
Makeup: Don Cash      
Wardrobe: Einar Bourman
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
James Hong: Barry Chan 
Strother Martin: Tomar
Jay Adler: Manny Ross
Carleton Young: Lt. Norman
Robert Williams: Veterinarian
Carlos Vera: Juanito
Jeanne Bates: Shiela
Frank McLun: Whitey Lawford (not credited)
Robert Strong: Driver (not credited)
Fred Shellac: Taxi Driver (not credited)
Chris Christie: Good Samaritan (?) (not credited)
 

LOCATION:

Los Angeles, California (Title reads: "Los Angeles International Airport")

DURATION:

2 days.

SUMMARY:

Manny Ross, diamond smuggler, sends Tomar, his accomplice, to Los Angeles International Airport to steal a dog belonging to a blind man arriving from Mexico.  On the same plane are Charlie Chan and his Number One Son, Barry.  Outside the terminal, his master shot dead, the dog runs off and is hit by an oncoming car.  Witnessing the accident, Chan asks for help to take the injured dog to a nearby veterinary hospital.  At the hospital, Chan meets Juanito, a young boy whose dog was also treated there.  The doctor tells Chan that the dog he brought in is not a guide dog as there was no foundation tag on the collar.  Working with Lt. Norman of the LAPD, Chan notes that the dead man has certainly not been blind which is later proven correct.

Late that night, Tomar breaks into the veterinary hospital in an attempt to steal the dog.  Bitten in the process, the arrival of Barry Chan, who is conducting his own investigation, stops Tomar short of his goal.  Pistol whipping Barry, Tomar makes his escape. 

CONCLUSION

 

At the hospital the next morning, Chan is informed that the dog's collar is missing.  Calling Shiela, the nurse, he finds that the collar was given to Juanito.  Suddenly, Tomar and Ross barge in, demanding the dog's collar.  Chan buys time by claiming that the dog that bit Tomar was rabid and that he should receive medical attention as soon as possible.  Juanito's arrival at the hospital nearly alerts the smugglers to his possession of the collar, but it is upon the arrival of a talkative Barry that Tomar and Ross find out the truth about the collar and the falsity of Chan's rabies story.  Angered at these revelations, Tomar, about to shoot Chan, is attacked by Juanito's dog, Senor Gordo.  Overcome by Chan and the doctor, Ross and Tomar are taken away by arriving police, led by Lt. Norman.  Cutting open the dog collar, Chan reveals the $50,000 worth of smuggled diamonds.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Sometimes pity, like precious pearl, disolves in wine of truth.
 
I have often observed that a simple rock sometimes conceals a valuable vein of gold.
 
You don't buy a book because of its cover.
 
A smuggler with a police record is like a banker without money.
 
Small boy too young to realize age gap never narrows.

 
 

Episode 5: The Great Salvos

Copyright 1957 by Vision Productions, Ltd. 
An Incorporated Television Corporation (ITC) Production
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
Sound facilities: Ryder Sound Services, Inc.
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Filmed in Hollywood" 
First aired: October 12, 1957 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow
Associate Producer:  
Director: Jack Gage 
Assistant Director:
Teleplay: Barry Shipman
Story:
Director of Photography:
Film Coordinator:
Film Editor:
Sound:
Script Supervisor:
Art Director:
Set Decorator:
Makeup:     
Wardrobe:
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
James Hong: Barry Chan 
Maria Palmer: Reeno Salvo [Salvonic]
Hans Conried: Carlo Salvo [Salvonic]
Grandon Rhodes: Douglas Fenton
Gertrude Michael: Joyce Fenton
Ralph Moody: Dr. Kruger
Damian O'Flynn: Lt. Delaney
William Tregoe: Dick Rand
Pat Colby: Agent
 

LOCATION:

Washington, District of Columbia (Title reads: "Washington D.C.")

DURATION:

2 days.

SUMMARY:

Douglas Fenton is attacked in his home and plans for a secret jet engine – Project 5 – are stolen.  At Lt. Delaney's office, Fenton is questioned and cautioned about frequenting Dick Rand's club which is a known center for espionage in Washington.  It turns out that Fenton is throwing a going away party for Charlie Chan, an old friend of Delany's.  That night, at Rand's club, Fenton and his wife his wife, Joyce, are entertaining Chan and Number One Son, Barry, who are scheduled to fly to Madrid later that night.  The act that they are there to see is a European brother and sister mentalist act known as the Great Salvos.  Tested by Barry, Reena Salvo, working with her brother, Carlo, reveals intimate knowledge of Chan, including the mental reading of an inscription on the back of his pocket watch.  Later, Dr. Kruger, who found Fenton unconscious the night before, arrives to join the party.  A suspicious Barry Chan feigns a headache, requesting – and palming – one of the fills that the doctor had given to Mrs. Fenton.  Chan receives a phone call from Lt. Delaney, which is listened to by Rand on another line.  Delaney requests that Chan delay his departure and meet with him the next morning.

 

Returning to his hotel room, Chan is attacked.  Barry arrives in time to chase away the attacker.  Later that night, Reena Salvo calls Chan and requests a meeting at a nearby park.  Reena states that her brother is in great danger.  Suddenly, a masked man robs Reena at gunpoint, searching Chan, but takes nothing.  During the robbery, Chan notices a familiar ring worn by the thief.  Chan tells Reena that he knows that the thief was Carlo.  Questioning her, Chan finds that Carlo and Reena are from Hungary and that their parents are still there.  The Salvos are being blackmailed in order to assure the safety of their parents.  Chan surmises that during the performance that night, Carlo had placed microfilm into his pocket watch which would have been retrieved later by a contact in Madrid.  The next morning at Dealany’s office, Chan hatches a plan to unmask the mastermind of the espionage plot.

 

CONCLUSION

 

At Dick Rand’s club trhat evening, the Fentons and Dr. Kruger are all perplexed as to who it was that had arranged their meeting at the club.  An arriving Barry announces that it was his father's idea as he wished to reciprocate for the kindness shown him the previous evening.  Barry finds that he has accidentally brought along his father's watch, which he lays on the table.  Suddenly, as Chan observes from backstage, the lights fade to black.  In a few moments the lights are turned on again.  Chan then joins the group, as Barry notes that the watch is now missing.  The Salvos now begin their performance, and Chan hands a note to Carlo who is asked to be mentally read by Reena.  As she recites the contents, is revealed that the Salvos parents are safe and sound in Austria.  Chan then requests that Reena reveal the location of the missing watch, which turns out to be inside of Mrs. Fenton's handbag.  Chan then discloses that it is she who is the head of the espionage ring.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
The inscription from Charlie Chan's pocket watch as mentally read by Reena Salvo: "The patient man accomplishes much.  For the impatient man, there is never time enough."
 
As obvious as bull trying to remove teacup from china shop.
 
When the door to one's mind is left unlocked, strangers bearing rich gifts are often visitors.

 
 

Episode 6: The Counterfeiters

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: 1957 or 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Leslie Arliss
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  Richard Grey
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Derek Hyde Chambers
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan 
John Bailey: Professor Wellman
Francis Matthews: Derek Robinson
William Franklyn: Jack Pearson
Leona Sharp: Doorman
Maurice Durant: Inspector Rawlins
Betty McDowell: Janet Rushton
 

LOCATIONS:

London, England and Paris, France (Title reads: "Paris")

DURATION:

3 days.

SUMMARY:

Eduard Brossolette, a representative from the Bank of France, stops by the London office of Gaylord and Carnot Engravers to pick up the plates for new 5,000 franc notes.  Sir John Rutheford, representing the engraving company, tells him that a messenger with proper papers had already picked them up that morning.  Brossolette states that these missing plates will soon be used by the thieves to produce a flood of counterfeit money.

 

Arriving in London from New York at the request of Inspector Duff, Charlie Chan and son Barry meet with Sir John.  Chan agrees to work alone on the case to find the identity of those who stole the plates.  Amid extreme secrecy, so as not to set off a panic, Chan and Barry fly to Paris.  Upon their arrival, Inspector Chauvet of the Paris Police informs Chan about Spanish Roy, Roy Bernard, a notorious forger who had produced the false documents that were used by those who stole the engraved plates in London.  When asked how Chan had come across the forged documents, Chan, honoring his promice of secrecy, refuses to answer.  Chauvet warns Chan not to interfere in the business of the French government.  As Chan and Barry leave, Chauvet gives orders to have them tailed.  Back at his hotel room, Chan, while checking in with Inspector Duff, finds that his phone has been tapped. 

 

That evening, Barry, working alone, stops by a cafe that turns out to be run by Spanish Roy.  Having picked Barry's pocket and realizing his true identity, Spanish Roy sends him on his way, suggesting that he stick to tourist spots.  Back at their hotel, Barry is surprised by the arrival of Spanish Roy who is suddenly shot by an unseen assailant through the window.  Saved by a pocket chess game, Spanish Roy, after a brief discussion, leaves and is immediately arrested by Inspector Chauvet who hands Chan deportation papers, instructing him to leave the country within 24 hours.  The next morning, Brossolette informs Chan that the deportation has been lifted and that the French Government has issued him a letter of general authority to proceed with his investigation.  Chan tells Barry, "Phone call to Minister of Finance most effective." 

 

Visiting Spanish Roy, whom he has had freed, Chan discusses the French Underground for which Spanish Roy had worked during the war.  Chan finds that a part of the Underground, has been reactivated for criminal purposes.  Spanish Roy states that he made the false documents for this group at the request of the French Secret Service.  Chan finds that the section Marquis commander from whom Spanish Roy received orders was a man code-named Michel, whose true identity he could not reveal.  The next morning, Spanish Roy hurriedly writes out Michel’s true identity and contact information, giving it to Barry who is entrusted to give it to his father.  Sir John, arriving at the hotel room, convinces Barry to give him the note, and sends him to Inspector Chauvet with another note.  At Chauvet’s office, after reading Sir John"s note, arrests Barry. 

 

CONCLUSION

 

Meanwhile, Chan has uncovered the location of Michel.  Arriving, Chan finds that he is none other than Sir John.  Sir John tells Chan that he cannot escape as the building is surrounded by Circuit members.  At police headquarters, Spanish Roy informs Inspector Chauvet that they have been duped by Sir John who is in reality a traitor.  Soon, Spanish Roy arrives where Sir John holds Chan.  Freeing Chan, Sir John flees, only to be gunned down by Circuit members waiting for him outside of the building.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Detectives, like busmen, must also have holiday.
 
Silence often speaks louder than words.
 
Eyesight of blind officials sometimes restored by appeal through pocketbook.
 
Volcanoes sometimes errupt when least expected.

 
 

Episode 7: The Death of a Don

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: September 21, 1957 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Don Chaffey
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  Maurice Tombragel
Original Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Ann Chegwidden
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan 
John Bailey: Dr. [Don] Wellman
Francis Matthews: Derek Robinson
William Franklyn: Jack Pearson
Leona Sharp: Doorman
Maurice Durant: Inspector Rawlins
Betty McDowell: Janet Rushton
 

PROBABLE LOCATION:

Stratford District of London, England (Title reads: "Stratford University - England")

DURATION:

2 days.

PROBABLE DATE:

Late February, 1957 (Based on the performance dates seen on the poster outside of the theater where Janet Rushton performed.)

SUMMARY:

At Stratford University, Derek Robinson, a friend of Barry Chan, has just completed a piano composition.  At his recital, Dr. Wellman, Derek's music professor, orders him to stop, calling his music "undisciplined drivel."  The result is a heated argument between the two with Derek leaving and suggesting that there is nothing in the future for people such as Wellman – only death.  Charlie Chan pays a visit to his son, Barry, who is currently taking classes to help out with his scientific approach to criminology.  Derek stops by, telling how he has been expelled for subordination.  At a local theater, Wellman asks the musical director, Jack Pearson, if he can see Janet Rushton, his estranged wife and the star performer of the latest show.  Wellman has come to ask Janet to come back to him, but she refuses.  Wellman feels that she is now romantically involved with Pearson, though she denies it saying that their relationship is purely professional. 

 

At a performance that evening, Chan and Barry are in attendance as are Dr. Wellman and Derek.  During the intermission, Chan and Barry run into Derek with Barry encouraging Derek to take the opportunity to offer an apology to Wellman.  Seeking to do so, the situation grows ugly with Wellman threatening to call the police.  As Derek storms out, Chan muses, "Hot heads never cool, just get more hot."  Wellman meets with Janet backstage, handing her an envelope containing his resignation from the university, should she decide to post it.  As the performance resumes, the theater doorman witnesses Derek fleeing after being seen crouching next to Wellman’s lifeless body in the alley. 

 

The next day, newspapers all point to Derek as the killer of Dr. Wellman.  Chan agrees to help prove the innocence of Barry's friend, to this end meeting with Inspector Rawlins, Janet, and Pearson to collect details about the crime.  Rawlins relates that the murder weapon was a circular instrument that was about the size of a pencil.  While searching the theater for clues, Barry tells his father that he has found the murder weapon – a hatpin from a Japanese costume belonging to Janet.  Banging on a set of bongos, Chan, seemingly indifferent, informs Barry, "No problem, case already solved."

 

CONCLUSION

 

At that night's performance, during the bongo solo, Chan finds Pearson backstage, suggesting that he is the guilty party, having killed Wellman out of jealousy, committing the murder during the bongo solo which offered ample time during which to carry out the deed.  He was afraid that he was about to lose Janet as well as his position had she left the theater for Don Wellman.  Chan quickly pulls the murder weapon – a hatpin - from Pearson’s coat.  A struggle ensues with Barry coming to his father's aid, overcoming Pearson.

OF NOTE:

Barry Chan notes to his father: "Next week is your birthday."  This would place Charlie Chan's birthday at either the end of the month of February or at the very beginning of March.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Do not underestimate old-fashioned use of brains.
 
There is most ancient remedy for dealing with hot-tempered people: apologize.
 
Fading flower no longer attracts bee.
 
Very few people have natural appetite for eating crow.
 
Hot heads never cool, just get more hot.
 
Hungry man never gets handout from minding other people's business.
 
Mouse pokes head in mouse trap - clook! - no head.
 
In murder cases, I find it very unwise to throw all eggs at one suspect.
 
Independent eagerness for research always commendable.

 
 

Episode 8: Charlie's Highland Fling

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: December 1, 1961 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Leslie Arliss
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  Fred Schiller
Original Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Derek Hyde Chambers
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan 
Percy Marmont: Sir Malcolm Gregg
Conrad Phillips; Donald Gregg
Ian Flemming
Ballard Berkeley: Runnals
Jack Lambert: Duncan
Sheila Cowan: Betsy
Hugh Moxey: Inspector Forsyth
 

LOCATION:

Glentarn County, Scotland

POSSIBLE DATE:

Late 1957.  Charlie Chan tells son Barry, For Chinese New Year will buy you bagpipes, indicating the approach of the New Year, which would have been February 3, 1958.  Chinese New Year for that present year would have been January 30, too early to be realistically considered.  Of course, Chan's statement could have been made at any time of the year and still hold its meaning.

DURATION:

1 day.

SUMMARY:

Charlie Chan and Number One Son, Barry, are visiting Gregg castle in Scotland.  Mr. Wingate, the Gregg family lawyer who is in charge of the family's business affairs,  fills Chan in on Sir Malcolm Gregg's marital problems, having nothing but very negative things to state about Lady Gregg, who is scheduled to arrive at the castle that day.  Wingate adds that Sir Malcolm's son, Donald, who will also be coming that day, is despised by Lady Gregg.  Meanwhile, Donald meets with his fiancé, Betsy, whom he tells in no uncertain terms that, try as she might, his step-mother will never cause the couple to separate. Back at the castle, Inspector Forsyth informs Sir Malcolm, Chan, and Wingate that Lady Gregg has been found murdered, having been shot on a country road.

 

Arriving at the family castle, Donald is informed of his step-mother's murder.  Runnals, the butler, brings in a rifle he has found in Donald's car, a find that is noted by all present.  However, Chan tells Barry that the real killer would certainly have disposed of the murder weapon.  Wingate admits to Chan that there are factors in both his and Sir Malcolm's lives that could be considered viable motives in the murder of lady gregg.  On top of this, Lady Gregg had recently had Betsy's father, Donald, jailed for poaching on the Gregg's property.  Runnals then informs Chan and Donald that Duncan escaped from prison that very morning. 

 

Barry presents Chan with his theory that it is Wingate who is the guilty party.  As he has found that Wingate has in his possession an detailed map of Glentarn County as well as travel brochures of Honduras, Barry surmises that Wingate killed Lady Gregg and now plans to escape to a location thousands of miles away.  However, Chan notes, "We are also on vacation, and our home in Honolulu is many thousands of miles away." 

 

While Chan, Barry, and Donald are out in the countryside verifying Donald’s story that he had fired his rifle at a tree to test it, Duncan, Sir Malcolm’s cousin, arrives inside the castle through a hidden passageway.  Wingate and Sir Malcolm, believing Duncan is innocent of the murder, suggest that he slip away to Ireland for a while in order to avoid bringing trouble to Donald and his daughter, Betsy.  Chan, arriving just after Duncan's departure, finds that Duncan has made his escape through the castle's hidden passageway.  Meanwhile, searching Runnal's quarters, Barry finds incriminating evidence connecting him with Lady Gregg, as well as a rifle which could be the murder weapon.  Runnals admits that he is Lady Gregg's brother, having played the part of a butler in order to escape punishment for crimes that he had committed in the past.  Runnels tries to make his escape, but Chan stops him.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Runnals explains that as a wanted criminal, he was innocent of the killing of his sister, Lady Gregg.  As Wingate further accuses Runnals of being the killer, Chan says, to the contrary, that it is actually Wingate, himself, who murdered Lady Gregg who had discovered that the lawyer had been stealing from the Gregg family for years.  As Wingate is taken away, Barry exclaims, "Didn’t I tell you he did it, Pop?"  "Yes, my son," Chan answers. "You had the right suspect – but for the wrong reasons.  However, very good try!"

OF NOTE:

Charlie Chan (to Barry): "For Chinese New Year will buy you bagpipes." 

Charlie Chan (To Sir Malcolm Gregg): "I am not so virtuous." (Regarding his smoking of a cigarette.) 

Charlie Chan (to Sir Malcolm Gregg): "Man can be without vice, but never without temptation - whiskey!" 

Charlie Chan (to Barry): "...we are also on vacation, and our home in Honolulu is many thousands of miles away."

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
In business of crime detection, mind like umbrella - only functions when open.
 
Hunch not important; motive, clue things that count.
 
Not important what I think.  What police think is important.
 
Man can be without vice but never without temtation.
 
Always have ideas - solution more difficult to come by.
 
Always unwise for innocent to run away.
 
When lawyer is around, watch for evidence of lawbreaking.

 
 

Episode 9: The Patient in Room 21

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
Aired: UK -  September 28, 1957; USA - unknown
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Don Chaffey
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  Robert Leslie Bellem
Original Story: Paul Erikson
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Ann Chegwidden
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan 
Peter Dyneley: Michael Winstead [Dr. Paul Ligget]
Honor Blackman: Elizabeth Vernon
Leslie Perrins: Judge
Raymond Francis: Sir Edward Pomeroy
Nancy Graham: Anne Jones
Henry Longhurst: George Morley
 

LOCATION:

London, England (First title reads: "Ottawa, Canada, 1947."  Second title reads: "Mercy Hospital - London")

DURATION:

3 days.

SUMMARY:

Barry Chan is in a London hospital recovering from an injury.  Visiting his son at the hospital, Charlie Chan confers with chief surgeon George Morley concerning Michael Winstead, another doctor at the hospital.  Morley has received a troubling letter stating that Winstead is, in reality, Paul Ligget who was convicted years ago in Ottawa, Canada for committing a mercy killing.  To spare Winstead a public investigation, Morley has enlisted the aid of Chan to perform a private investigation in the matter.  Barry reminds his father that Winstead, Chan's friend, had saved his life to years ago by removing a bullet from the detective's body.  Agreeing to take the case and taking the letter with them to test it for fingerprints, Chan and Barry run into Nurse Elizabeth Vernon who had apparently been listening outside of Morley's office door.  It later becomes apparent that Elizabeth and Winstead have a romantic connection.

 

At their hotel that night, Chan and Barry is attacked by a burglar who then steals the incriminating letter about Winstead.  At the hospital the next morning, Barry is once again a patient, recovering from the attack that night.  Discussing who it was that may have stolen the letter and why, Chan makes an overseas telephone call to the Ottawa Police in Canada.  Obtaining the information he seeks, Chan has Barry fly to Canada on a special errand.  Returning the next day with a woman named Anne Gerald, who was the euthanasia victim's private nurse and was familiar with Dr. Ligget.  Chan and Barry take her to the hospital to prove one way or the other whether Winstead is or is not Ligget.  Miss Gerald states that she has never seen Winstead before.  Apparently cleared, Winstead admits that he actually is Ligget, offering his resignation.

 

Back at his hotel room, Chan asks Anne why she had tried to spare Winstead.  Chan notes that Miss Gerald obviously feels that Winstead was innocent of the crime.  Later, at the hospital, Anne, discussing with Winstead how it was actually she who had committed the mercy killing, agrees to issue a confession so as to clear Winstead.  Winstead leaves his office to get Chan who will witness the confession.  Returning with the detective, Miss Vernon is found lying on the floor clinging to life, having been stabbed with a scalpel.  After placing a call to Inspector Duff about the attack on Miss Vernon, Barry returns to inform his father that Sir Edward Pomeroy, the hospital administrator who has been ailing, has collapsed in Morley’s office and will require immediate surgery which will be performed by Morley.  Speaking with Sir Edward, Chan informs him that it was probably Morely who attacked Anne, surmising that he feared he would lose his position as head surgeon at the hospital should Winstead be cleared of the past crime.  It was he, Chan continues, who had sent himself the incriminating letter.  He also suggests that Morley had probably made Sir Edward ill somehow in order to operate on him and kill him in the process, again, to preserve his position at the hospital.  Sir Edward cannot believe Chan's accusation.  Barry arrives to inform his father that Miss Gerald has just died and that she was not able to state who it was who had attacked her.

 

CONCLUSION

 

While Sir Edward is being wheeled to surgery, he expresses his faith in Morley, stating that he will have his job forever.  Suddenly, Sir Edward becomes aware that his surgeon is actually Winstead, sending him into a fit of terror.  Chan tells Sir Edward why he is so afraid of Winstead.  It was actually Sir Edward who had sent the incriminating letter to Morley.  It was also Sir Edward who had killed Miss Gerald, hoping to throw suspicion on Winstead.  In terror of the prospect of dying at the hands of Winstead, Sir Edward admits his crimes, stating that he did it all for Elizabeth whom he loved, wanting Winstead out of her life.  Chan notes that it will be Winstead who will save Sir Edward for the hangman.

OF NOTE:

Charlie Chan: "...I am retired policeman eager for inactivity."

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Unlike postman who takes walk on vacation, I am retired policeman eager for inactivity.
 
Mutual alibi like cracked teacup - does not always hold water.
 
Like expert surgeon, you go directly to heart of problem.
 
Like broken Ming vase, uneasy conscience very difficult to mend.

 
 

Episode 10: The Rajput Ruby

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: October 19, 1957 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Don Chaffey
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  John K. Butler
Original Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Derek Hyde Chambers
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan
Michael Ritterman: Majaraja of Rajput
Jill Melford: Majarana of Rajput (formally known as Ida Kelly)
Maurice Kaufmann: Lefty Ryan
Bill Nagy: Joseph Rotella
Charles Morgan: Scotland Yard Inspector (?)
Arnold Marlé: Jan Dikker
Donal Donnelly: Hotel Porter (not credited)
 

LOCATION:

London, England (Title reads: "The Tower of London")

DURATION:

1 day.

SUMMARY:

The Majaraja and Majarana of Rajput have come to Charlie Chan to help them recover the famous Rajput Ruby necklace which was stolen during a visit to the Tower of London.  The Majarana ia an American who is a native New Yorker.  She tells Barry Chan that her father owns a percentage of the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team.  The Majaraja is offering a $25,000 reward for the recovery of the ruby, but, refusing the reward, Chan agrees to take the case because it is of interest to him.  The Majaraja adds that Scotland Yard has recommended the services of Chan to protect their belongings when the couple visit Paris later that week.  It seems that their previous private detective, Joe Rotella, was fired by the Majaraja as they had been the victims of theft on three occasions over the past year.

 

Visiting the Tower of London, Chan and Barry learn from a Scotland Yard inspector that a thorough search of everyone who was in the Tower when the ruby disappeared proved fruitless.  Also, nothing was found after a search of the Tower itself.  The question remains as to how the Rajput Ruby was taken out of the Tower.  To that, Chan states that to find the answer, “must ask thief who stole same.”

 

Returning to their hotel, Chan and Barry run into an American who, Barry later tells his father, is Lefty Ryan, a baseball player who was once very popular in Brooklyn, but whose bad temper eventually led to the end of his career.  Upon entering their room, Chan and Barry find Joe Rotello.  Rotello blames the Majaraja for the recent thefts of his valuables.  He adds that before marrying the Majaraja, Ida Kelly was just “a pretty kid in Brooklyn.”  However, the Majaraja’s wealth has now gone to her head.  When asked about the Majarana’s father, Rotella notes that he might sell hotdogs for the Dodgers, but that would be his only connection to the team.  Rotella tells Chan that he will be leaving London for home, but it is soon obvious that he had other plans.  Chan feels that Rotella may be staying in London in order to recover his lost reputation by finding the stolen ruby.  However, Barry feels that Rotella may have a romantic connection with Ida.

 

Using a hotel pass key given to him by Rotella, Barry searches the private detective’s room at the hotel, finding torn-up photographs showing that Ida and Lefty Ryan were obviously romantically involved.  Later, Evans comes to Rotella’s room, threatening him if he does not give him a half cut of the Rajput Ruby, although Rotella claims to know nothing of the ruby.  Soon, Chan and Barry enter Rotella’s room, finding the detective unconscious on the floor.  Claiming he was drunk and had fallen down, knocking himself out.  As a doubtful father and son leave, Rotella retrieves the Rajput Ruby from where he had hidden it.  Later, the Majaraja explains to Chan that his wife was once engaged to Lefty Ryan.  It seems that Ryan has been following the couple on their journeys. 

 

CONCLUSION

 

Meeting with the Majarana, Chan tells her that it was actually she who had stolen the ruby, knowing that she would not be searched.  Chan adds that the ruby was stolen in order to pay off a blackmailer – Rotella – who was being paid off to keep silent about her continuing affair with Lefty Ryan.  Meanwhile, Rotella has taken the ruby to Jan Dikker, an unscrupulous diamond cutter.  Barry, who was following Rotella, is captures at Dikker’s shop by Ryan who reveals that he and Rotella are now ‘partners.”  Responding to a pre-arranged telephone call from Barry’s taxicab driver, Chan arrives at Dikker’s shop.  Breaking in on and surprising Ryan and Rotella who are holding Barry, father and son overcome the pair and hold them for the authorities.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
First sign of age when man cannot tie shoe from standing position.
 
Secret romance like dead ant in pepper pot - very often difficult to detect.
 
Sometimes being half right makes for being half wrong.
 
On many occasions ethics prevent private detective from divulging secret.
 
Secret, when told to another, is no longer secret.
 
Old romance, like cat, sometimes has nine lives.

 
 

Episode 11: The Final Curtain

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: October 5, 1957 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Alvin Rakoff
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Teleplay:  Gene Wang
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Ann Chegwidden
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan
John Longden: Philip Royce
Patricia Marmont: Claire Harris
Mary Steele: Barbara Royce
Rupert Davies: Inspector Duff
David Oxley: Johnny Douglas
Lynn Cole: Maid (not credited)
Mike Malone: Harry (not credited)
 

LOCATION:

London, England (Title reads: "Archway Hotel - London")

DURATION:

3 days.

SUMMARY:

Charlie Chan is visited at his hotel by a gentleman introducing himself as the Earl of Latham.  Chan, noting his cufflinks are marked "PR," states that his real name is Philip Royce, an actor who Chan recalled seeing on stage a few years before.  Mr. Royce has come to Chan seeking his help to protect his daughter, Barbara, from whom he has been distant for years, from a swindler named Johnny Douglas who preys on young, wealthy women.  He states that he learned of Douglas from a woman named Claire Harris.

 

It turns out that Johnny is actually a partner in crime with Claire.  It is she who sets up women for Johnny to then take advantage of with the pair splitting the take in each swindle.  In this case, however, Johnny has actually fallen for his intended victim and wants to end his relationship with Claire.  Miss Harris states in no uncertain terms that if she can't have Johnny, no one will.  Arriving at Claire's apartment, Chan with son, Barry, questions Claire about Johnny.  After admitting to Chan that she and Johnny had had a shady dealing with another young woman, Chan, satisfied with the information gained, departs.

 

Royce pays a visit to his daughter, Barbara, apologizing for not having been a good parent.  Trying to warn her about Johnny, Barbara is angered, asking her father to leave.  At his hotel, Chan receives a telephone call from Royce who tells him that he has arranged to have Johnny meet him that night at his apartment.  As Chan warns him against this idea, there is a knock at Royce's door.  Setting down the telephone receiver, he sees who it is.  On his end of the line, Chan hears Royce speaking with Douglas and then a gunshot sounds.  Later, at Royce's apartment Inspector Duff states his belief to Chan that the case is open and shut, ordering the arrest of Douglas for Royce's murder.  Chan, however, is not convinced, feeling that the window of Royce's fourth-floor apartment and a water tank below have played a role in the mystery, perhaps an avenue of escape for the killer.

 

Douglas visits Barbara who is visibly colder toward Johnny.  Chan and Duff suddenly arrive with the news of her father's murder.  Barbara, faced with the circumstantial evidence before her, believes that Johnny is guilty, despite Douglas' emotional denial.  At Scotland Yard, Johnny is questioned by Inspector Duff.  Claire is brought in as well for questioning, denying Johnny's claim that he had visited her at about the same time as the murder occurred.  An angered and betrayed Johnny lunges for Claire, but he is stopped and taken away.  Duff, asking Chan if he is convinced yet as to Johnny's guilt, states that he is convinced only that "with woman like Claire for friend, he has no need for enemy."

 

Back at their hotel room, Barry comes to the realization that it was actually Claire who shot Mr. Royce, then hoping to frame Johnny for the crime.  She must have used a tape recorder, he feels, to produce Johnny's voice during the murder.  Barry then hatches a plan to seek evidence at Claire's apartment, involving the use of two bottles of champagne to gain entrance to her apartment.  Chan warns his eager son that "bubbly champagne very, very sneaky."  Later, at Claire's apartment, a dead drunk Barry passes out, having fallen far short of his goal.

 

CONCLUSION

 

The next day, Chan and a hung over Barry await the arrival of Inspector Duff at Royce's apartment.  Duff arrives and states that witnesses did, indeed, hear a splash of water following the sound of the gunshot, thus proving Chan’s theory that the killer could have escaped through the window and into the small water tank below.  Questioning Barbara Royce, Chan reveals that her father had actually shot himself in such a way as to make it look as if Johnny had killed him, hoping in this way to protect her from Douglas.  Royce had attached a weight connected to his gun by a cord.  Using his acting skills and feigning an argument with Johnny, Royce shot himself, his lifeless fingers releasing the weapon with the attached weight pulling the gun across the room, out through the window and onto the water tank below.  In reality, the "killer" of Royce – the gun - had indeed escaped through the window.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Very wise man said, "Story of nature much more important than study of fingerprints."
 
Role of father very difficult to play without great preparation.
 
Sometimes, cracked boat, when in middle of river, is too late to stop leak.
 
Wise man once said, "Drink wine in proper mood, sing loud in suitable location."
 
Would be exceedingly foolish to seek further when pot of gold has been found at the foot of rainbow.
 
When water is muddy, very difficult to perceive nature of fish.
 
Trying to stop Number One Son when he desires to speak is like holding back ocean with small sponge.
 
Men live together like birds in the woods, but when death comes, each takes his own flight.
 
The obvious and truth rarely identical.
 
No greater pleasure than agreeing with friend's opinion.
 
Delay does not alter bad news.
 
Word of advice from ancient traveler: bubbly champagne very, very sneaky.
 
To learn what is good, thousand days are not enough.  To learn what is evil, one hour is more than enough.
 
If you are not sailor, do not use boat hook.
 
After death, man gives up everything he holds.
 
No actor, no matter how great, should ever try to play the part of destiny.

 
 

Episode 12: Death at High Tide

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
in association with Incorporated Television Programme Company, Ltd.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers
First aired: May 6, 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Leslie Arliss
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Teleplay:  Lee Erwin
Original Story: Kenneth Enochs
Director of Photography: Kenneth Talbot
Film Editor: Derek Hyde Chambers
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan
Ivan Craig: Henri Mazarac
Victor Beaumont: Karl Bretner
Peter Dyneley: John Robey
Lisa Daniely: Marie Mazarac
Thomas Gallagher: Jacob Brun
Henry Vidon: Inspector Darnet
Leslie Weston: Wells
 

LOCATIONS:

London, England and Arcachon, France (First title reads: "London."  Second title reads: "Arcachon near Bordeaux")

PROBABLE DURATION:

3 days.

SUMMARY:

Karl Bretner, a prisoner at a war criminals camp in Germany, is aided in his escape.  In London, Chan, with son, Barry, meet with Mr. Wells, the head of a large insurance brokerage firm.  The news of Bretner's escape may prove to be of use to his company which, during the war, had insured a ship that was carrying ten million dollars worth of gold bullion which was sunk by Bretner.  As Bretner would be the only one who would know the location of the sunken ship, Wells asks Chan to find Bretner so that the missing gold can be recovered.  To this end, working on a hunch, Wells sends Chan to the small coastal French town of Arcachon near Bordeaux to meet a man named Henri Marzac.

 

In France, Chan and Barry meet with Marzac at his seaside inn.  Henri recounts how he has unsuccessfully tried to help Wells locate the sunken vessel.  An experienced diver, Marzac, who is very familiar with the region where the ship was reportedly sunk states that if he could not find the ship, how could an escaped Nazi?  Even though Bretner destroyed his log which contained the location of the ship, Chan suggests that Bretner's memory may contain the secret of its location.  John Robey, the only survivor of the sunken vessel was pulled from the sea and nursed back to health by Henri and his wife, Marie.  Marzac notes that even with Robey’s help, the ship will not be found.  Chan and Barry stay at the inn to await the arrival of Bretner.  Henri warns that Marie, who hates all Nazis because they killed her parents during the war, may not be able to contain her hatred toward Bretner to the point of doing him harm. 

 

Late that night, Chan is awakened by the sounds of Bretner's arrival downstairs.  Bretner is accompanied by John Robey who believes that between the two of them there will be enough information to find the sunken ship and the gold within.  Henri is offered a cut of the expected profits, but Marie vehemently refuses, her hatred for Bretner being very obvious.  When Chan and Barry arrive downstairs, John introduces Bretner as his chauffeur, in order to keep the detective in the dark.  Not fooled by the deception, Chan turns in for the night while Barry goes to the kitchen for a midnight snack.  Suddenly, Barry is attacked from behind by an unknown assailant.

 

The next morning, Barry recovers from the blow to his head while Henri admits to Chan that the many they saw last night was Bretner, although he does not know where he is now.  Henri tells how Bretner has stolen the boat, leaving John behind, and that John is now searching for him.  Henri fears that if John finds Bretner bloodshed could result.  Soon, a man named Jacob Brun enters the inn.  He was a guard at the prison where Bretner was held and is seeking Bretner who, after receiving many favors from Brun,  had blackmailed him into helping him escape.  Together he, Chan, Barry, and Henri set out to search for Bretner.

 

On the beach, Chan finds the body of Bretner with a gold bar still clutched in his lifeless hand.  At the inn, Darnet, an police inspector, states his belief that it was Robey who killed Bretner, taking all of the gold for himself, noting that he has ordered a land and sea search for the American.  After Darnet leaves, Barry suggests that Brun would have had a motive to kill Bretner.  Bretner admits that he would have killed Bretner had he found him first, as Bretner had killed Brun's father at Dachau during the war.  Chan feels that the murder of Bretman pointed too obviously toward Robey.  Barry adds that the gold bar found with Bretner had obviously been out of sea water for a long time due to its particular discoloration.  A proud father concurs.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Late that night, Chan catches Brun in the wine cellar of the inn looking for the missing gold.  Sending Brun away, he finds Robey bound and gagged.  Upstairs, Henri finds Chan who informs the innkeeper that Bretner died in the inn of a broken neck.  Also, Bretner's clothing was soaked not by salt water but from the night before his body was found.  Pressing Marie, she admits that Bretner died from an accidental fall down the cellar stairs, but Chan suggests that she had helped him fall to his death.  Also, Chan accuses Henri of planning to kill his friend Robey.  This is verified by the American who appears from the cellar, subduing Henri who had just struggled with Chan.  Later, Chan takes Barry down to the wine cellar where he shows his son how the missing gold was hidden inside the wine barrels.

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
Uninvited guest should always remain unobtrusive. 
 
Dullness part of policemen's life.
 
Nature always most interesting.
 
Hungry man never quarrels with cook.
 
It is said, "He who has patience to wait will catch small fish if not large."
 
A time to fish and a time to dry nets.
 
Have acquired many eccentricities over passing years; one in particular - I never answer questions at point of gun.

 
 

Episode 20: The Noble Art of Murder

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers 
First aired: March 12, 1958 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Charles Bennett
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  John Butler
Director of Photography: W. Suschitzky
Film Editor: Derek Hyde Chambers
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
 

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan
Mary Kerridge: Madame Dubois
Ferdie Mayne: Georges Larue
Andre Maranne: Jacques Flaubert
Teresa Thome: Mary Warner
Malou Pantera: Odette Dubois
 

LOCATION:

Brussels, Belgium (Title reads: "Brussels")

DURATION:

2 days.

SUMMARY:

In Brussels, Belgium, Barry Chan participates in a French sabot boxing match.  After Barry knocks out his opponent, Henri Bergette, it is announced that the downed fighter is dead.  The police are called and Inspector Pierre Renal, an old friend of Charlie Chan, arrives.  Later, with Chan present, Renal begins the investigation.  Soon, Madame Dubois and her daughter, Henri’s fiancé, Odette, arrive at the gym, joining Georges Larue, Madame Dubois’ brother and owner of the gym.  George comforts his niece, and Inspector Renal allows Barry to leave with his father, adding that he must remain in Brussells until the investigation is complete.

 

At a street café, Barry tells his father his belief that Henri did not die as a result of their match.  Barry had, after returning to the gym after his shower, had noticed that Henri’s body was in a different location than where he had left him following his being knocked out.  Barry speculates that someone must have murdered Henri during his absence.  When Chan asks if there had been any witnesses, Barry notes that a group of tourists had visited the gym and had witnessed the sabot match.

 

Chan and Barry locate the office of the tour guide, Jacques Flaubert.  While he is being questioned, Mary Warner, one of the group of tourists who had taken a number of photographs during Barry’s match at the gym, suddenly arrives for her planned dinner date with Flaubert.  Among her developed photographs, Chan and Barry find a number of them showing his sabot match with Henri.  Later hat night, Barry slips into the gym seeking clues to clear himself by returning to the scene of the crime.  Caught inside the gym by Inspector Larue and Georges, thus bringing even more suspicion on himself, Barry is arrested.

 

Visiting Barry at the city jail, Chan tells his son that Henri died of a skull fracture.  Barry thinks that Inspector Renal is more interested in helping Odette than anything else in this case as he had once been engaged to her.  Barry admits to Chan that, in a moment of anger during their match, he had made what could haven been deemed a threat against Henri, something that had been noted by three witnesses: Georges, Jacques Flaubert, and Mary Warner.  When asked by his father if there was any friction between Georges and Henri, Barry mentions the fact that Georges had not wanted his niece to marry Henri, but were on decent terms otherwise.  Inspector Renal informs Chan that Barry may leave the jail as Chan has posted adequate bail.

 

Later, Chan and Barry visit Odette and her mother.  When asked about her brother Georges’ anger toward Henri, Madame Dubois recounts how she had given her daughters’ fiancé a large dowry.  Henri had expressed his desire to use the money to invest in a gym in Antwerp, but while he was on his way there, had been robbed of the money.  Henri, who had wanted to use his sister’s money to invest in his own gym.

 

Back at their hotel room, Chan and Barry analyze the series of pictures taken by Mary Warner at the sabot match, as well as a photo taken by a newspaper photographer later.  Chan notes that, besides the fact that Henri’s body had obviously moved from the ring to another location in the gym, a set if Indian clubs on the wall had also been altered from one picture to the later newspaper image.  From this evidence, Charlie Chan informs Barry that he has not only determined the murder weapon but the identity of the murderer as well.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Returning to the gym, Chan and Barry, with Georges in tow, search for the missing murder weapon.  In Henri’s locker, Chan finds a gambling receipt from a Monte Carlo casino.  It seems that Henri had probably gambled away Madame Dubois’ money.  Next, finding the Indian club, Chan tells Barry to contact Inspector Renal, as the fingerprints will prove the identity of the killer.  Georges makes a desperate move, but he is stopped by Barry who uses sabot moves to subdue him.  Madame Dubois and Odette now arrive with Inspector Renal at the request of Charlie Chan.  Chan reveals that although Georges was involved, it was actually his sister, Madame Dubois who had clubbed Henri to death, feeling him to be unworthy of her daughter, Odette.  After Barry had hurried to the shower after knocking out Henri, Georges, the referee of the match, announced that Henri was dead.  With the gym hurriedly cleared of visitors, Madame Dubois attacked Henri from behind as he revived and stumbled from the ring.

OF NOTE:

Charlie Chan: "So, retired Honolulu detective asks himself question."

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
No words can express adequate sympathy for loss of a loved one.
 
Self-reproach does not solve problems.
 
Old saying: "Words in jest often lead to misunderstanding."
 
Impatience sometimes is like large stone in pants - weight can trip you up. 

 
 

Episode 27: The Airport Murder Case

Copyright Television Productions of America, Inc. 1957
Distributed by: Television Programs of America, Inc.
RCA Sound Recording
Running Time: 26 minutes
"Made on Location in England"
Based upon characters as created by Earl Der [sic] Biggers 
First aired: December 28, 1957 (UK)
 

Executive Producer: Leon Fromkess
Producer: Rudolph C. Flothow
Associate Producer: Herman Blaser
Director: Don Chaffey
Production Manager: Aida Young 
Assistant Director: David Tomblin
Teleplay:  Jerry Sackheim and Stuart Jerome
Original Story: Brock Williams
Director of Photography: W. Suschitzky
Film Editor: Inman Hunter
Story Editor: Jerry Sackheim
Art Director: Harry White
Makeup: Colin Garde
Sound Supervisor: Fred Turtle
     

CAST:

J. Carrol Naish: Charlie Chan
 
James Hong: Barry Chan
Raymond Young: Dino Rienzi
Arthur Gomez: Inspector Galvani
Kay Callard: Carlo Vane (?)
Gene Anderson
Alex Scott
          

 
 

LOCATION:

Rome, Italy (Title reads: "Rome")

DURATION:

2 days.

SUMMARY:

Joan Marsh is shot dead upon arrival at a Rome railway station.  Charlie Chan and Number One Son, Barry, are on vacation in that city, and Dino Rienzi, a friend of Joan's, calls on the detective to take on the case.  Chan telephones Inspector Galvani, an old friend of his who is currently working on an espionage case of national importance involving a nuclear reactor project.  Chan explains that it will not be he but his son, Barry, who will pay a visit regarding the murdered woman.

Later, Chan visits a nightclub where Joan worked as a singer.  There, he speaks with Marta Ricci who relates gossip she has heard about Dino Rienzi having left Joan for a wealthy American widow named Carol Vane.  Meanwhile, at Dino's apartment, Inspector Galvani finds a gun which later proves to be the weapon which killed Joan Marsh.  Chan notes, however, that "obvious answer is not always solution to crime."

CONCLUSION:

Late that night, Chan ans Barry observe the nightclub after closing time.  Chan catches Marta and her assistant, Alfredo, in the act of sending out messages about the government reactor project based on information that has been passed to them.  He discovers that Joan was murdered because she had caught on to the scheme and had blackmailed Marta in return for remaining quiet. 

CHARLIE CHAN'S APHORISMS:
 
As Mr. Barnum once said, 'When buying calf for sideshow, two heads better than one.'"
 
I must confide old detective saying: "When client wants trap set for another, sometimes gets caught by same himself."
 
Very sedate - like nuclear explosion.
 
In murder investigation, everything is grist to detective's mill.Many marriages are not necessarily made in heaven.
 
Obvious answer not necessarily solution to crime. 

 
 

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